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Marine Corps Picture Frames & Certificate Holders

U.S. Marine Corps picture frames and display case honor your corpsmen by providing a stunning mahogany stained frame setting.

These Marine Corps picture frames are exclusively manufactured in our Kansas City Missouri facility. A Marine Corps specified blue matting compliments the officially licensed Marine Corps medallion in each frame.

Marine Corps frames offer two settings, a setting for pictures and a setting for certificates of achievement to memorialize the service of our nations bravest. Semper Fidelis.

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U.S. Marine Corps Medallion

U.S. Marine Corps Medallion
  • Year First Used: 1868
  • Designed By: Official Committee
  • Design: An insignia including a globe turned to the Western Hemisphere, a fouled anchor, an eagle with his wings spread open, and a ribbon bearing the Marine Corps motto "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful).

History

Eagle, Globe, and Anchor

The United States Marine Corps dates back to the Revolutionary War, when the device used to represent the corps (then called the Continental Marines) consisted of a lone fouled anchor. Through the years this device or symbol changed many times. In 1804 a symbol that consisted of a brass eagle holding a fouled anchor was used, and in 1834 a symbol with a brass eagle with a wingspan of 3.5 inches was used. In 1868, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin, appointed a committee to design and choose the different devices and ornaments that would represent the Marine Corps. In November of that same year, the committee recommended that an insignia with an eagle, globe, and anchor be used. This insignia, which is still the symbol of the Marine Corps today, was approved by the Secretary of the Navy on November 19th, 1868.