Home > Military Flags > U.S. Army Flags
Sort By:
Page of 1
   
 

U.S. Army Flag

U.S. Army Flag
U.S. Army Flag
  • Year First Flown: 1956
  • Created By: U.S. Army
  • Design: The flag features the American colors of red (courage), white (remembrance), and blue (loyalty) with the War Office Seal embroidered in blue as the flag's central design. Beneath the seal "United States Army" is written in white on a scarlet scroll, and the year "1775" is written in blue below the scroll.
  • Use Today: The flag of the U.S. Army is flown at official ceremonies and different government offices

History

June 14th (Flag Day), 1956, the U.S. Army officially unfurls and dedicates its flag for the first time at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
June 14th (Flag Day), 1956, the U.S. Army officially unfurls and dedicates its flag for the first time at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Even though the U.S. Army was first created in 1775, in the year 1956 the Army was the only armed service in America without an official flag to represent the organization as a whole. On June 12th, 1956, this flag was officially approved by President Dwight D. Eisenhower through Executive Order No. 10670. The next day (June 13th), the flag was presented by Vice President Richard Nixon to the Secretary of the Army, Wilber M. Brucker, in a ceremony in Washington DC. Finally, On June 14th (Flag Day), 1956, the U.S. Army officially unfurled and dedicated its flag for the first time at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A video of Vice President Nixon presenting the flag to Wilber M. Brucker can be viewed here.

War Office Seal

Department of the Army of the United States of America
Department of the Army of the United States of America
  • The War Office Seal that appears on the U.S. Army Flag was officially authorized by the Continental Congress on May 8th, 1779. It contains quite a few different symbols with many different meanings, including:
  • A drum with two drumsticks to symbolize public notification and intent to serve America and its people
  • A mortar on a carriage and two powder flasks, a cannon and three cannon balls, a sword, half-pike, musket, and bayonet to represent Army equipment
  • A Roman breastplate to symbolize strength and defense
  • A Phrygian cap, the traditional symbol of liberty
  • The American Flag of the Revolutionary War Era
  • A rattlesnake, which is a popular sign of American character and fortitude, and used on other flags like the Gadsden and Culpeper